Oracle’s Allies Against Google Include Scott McNealy and America’s Justice Department

    0
    13

    America’s Justice Department “has filed a brief in support of Oracle in its Supreme Court battle against Google over whether Java should have copyright protection,” reports ZDNet: The Justice Department filed its amicus brief to the Supreme Court this week, joining a mighty list of briefs from major tech companies and industry luminaries — including Scott McNealy, co-founder of Sun, which Oracle bought in 2010, acquiring Sun-built Java in the process. While Microsoft, IBM and others have backed Google’s arguments in the decade-long battle, McNealy, like the Justice Department, is opposing Google. McNealy called Google’s description of how it uses Java packages a “woeful mischaracterization of the artful design of the Java packages” and “an insult to the hard-working developers at Sun who made Java such a success….” Joe Tucci, former CEO of now Dell-owned enterprise storage giant EMC, threw in his two cents against Google. “Accepting Google’s invitation to upend that system by eliminating copyright protection for creative and original computer software code would not make the system better — it would instead have sweeping and harmful effects throughout the software industry,” Tucci’s brief reads. Oracle is also questioning the motives of Google’s allies, reports The Verge: After filing a Supreme Court statement last week, Oracle VP Ken Glueck posted a statement over the weekend assailing the motives of Microsoft, IBM, and the CCIA industry group, all of which have publicly supported Google. Glueck’s post comes shortly after two groups — an interdisciplinary panel of academics and the American Conservative Union Foundation — submitted legal briefs supporting Oracle. Both groups argued that Google should be liable for copying code from the Java language for the Android operating system. The ACUF argued that protecting Oracle’s code “is fundamental to a well-ordered system of private property rights and indeed the rule of law itself….” Earlier this year, Google garnered around two dozen briefs supporting its position. But Oracle claims that in reality, “Google appears to be virtually alone — at least among the technology community.” Glueck says Google’s most prominent backers had ulterior motives or “parochial agendas”; either they were working closely with Google, or they had their own designs on Java… Even if you accept Oracle’s arguments wholeheartedly, there’s a long list of other Google backers from the tech community. Advocacy groups like the Electronic Frontier Foundation and the Center for Democracy and Technology signed on to amicus briefs last month, as did several prominent tech pioneers, including Linux creator Linus Torvalds and Apple cofounder Steve Wozniak. The CCIA brief was signed by the Internet Association, a trade group representing many of the biggest companies in Silicon Valley. Patreon, Reddit, Etsy, the Mozilla Corporation, and other midsized tech companies also backed a brief raising “fundamental concerns” about Oracle’s assertions. Read more of this story at Slashdot.

    LEAVE A REPLY

    Please enter your comment!
    Please enter your name here